Air Quality Facts

  • More than 4 out of 10 people live where the air they breathe earned an F in #StateoftheAir 2015. @LungAssociation
  • Nearly 138.5 million people live in counties that received an F for either ozone or particle pollution. @LungAssociation #StateoftheAir
  • Nearly 17.8 million people live in counties that got an F for all three air pollution measures. @LungAssociation #StateoftheAir
  • Cleaner power plants and diesel engines helped cut year-round particle pollution in many areas in #StateoftheAir 2015. @LungAssociation
  • 13 of the most ozone-polluted cities had lower ozone in 2011-2013 @LungAssociation #StateoftheAir.
  • 12 of the most ozone-polluted cities had worse ozone in 2011-2013 @LungAssociation #StateoftheAir.
  • 13 cities with the worst annual particle pollution had their lowest-ever in 2011-2013. #StateoftheAir @LungAssociation
  • Six cities had their worst spikes in dangerous particle pollution in 2011-2013. #StateoftheAir @LungAssociation
  • Looking for a clean air city? Six cities made all #StateoftheAir cleanest cities lists in 2011-2013. @LungAssociation
  • @LungAssociation fights for reduced power plant emissions-especially carbon- and stronger safeguards. #StateoftheAir
  • Breathing ozone irritates the lungs, resulting in something like a bad sunburn within the lungs. #StateoftheAir @LungAssociation
  • Breathing in particle pollution can increase the risk of lung cancer, according to the World Health Organization.
  • Particle pollution can also cause early death and heart attacks, strokes and emergency room visits for people with asthma, cardiovascular disease and diabetes.
  • Particles are smaller than 1/30th the diameter of a human hair. When you inhale them, they are small enough to get past the body's natural defenses.
  • Ozone and particle pollution are both linked to increased risk of lower birth weight in newborns.
  • Cleaner air may add 4 months on to the average person's life, according to one study.
  • Do you live near, or work on or near a busy highway? Pollution from the traffic may put you at greater risk of harm.
  • People who work or exercise outside face increased risk from the effects of air pollution.
  • Certain groups are especially vulnerable to the effects of air pollution, such as: infants, older adults and people with lung diseases like asthma.
  • Minorities and lower income groups are often disproportionately affected by air pollution which put them at higher risk for illnesses.
  • Air pollution is a serious health threat. It sends people to the hospital, shapes how kids' lungs develop, and can even be deadly.
  • Steps you can take to improve air quality will also help fight climate change. Drive less. Don't burn wood or trash. Use less electricity. Make sure your school system requires clean buses.
  • You can protect your family by checking the air quality forecasts in your community and avoiding exercising or working outdoors when the unhealthy air is expected.
  • Big polluters and some members of Congress are trying to change the Clean Air Act and dismantle 45 years' of progress. The Lung Association is fighting to keep the law strong to continue to protect public health.
  • Cutting air pollution through the Clean Air Act will prevent at least 230,000 deaths and save $2 trillion annually by 2020.